November is National American Indian Heritage Month.

Celebrating National American Indian Heritage Month by honoring Native American students

Partnership With Native Americans (PWNA) is recognizing National American Indian Heritage Month by honoring Native American students and the connection between history, education and heritage. Join us from November 1 through 15, 2017 for daily prizes and a Native education quiz. Winners will be announced every weekday. View our complete contest rules and visit us daily for the next chance to win.



AIEF Laptop Winners   Native Quiz   Grand Prize Drawing


Student Spotlight on AIEF Laptop Winners

PWNA, through its American Indian Education Fund (AIEF) program, awards scholarships to undergraduate and graduate students annually. This Heritage Month, we are also awarding laptops to 5 freshman students who are AIEF scholarship recipients. Check back daily on Nov. 1, 2, 3, 6 and 7 for updates on our daily winners.


Winner #1 (Nov. 1): Roselynne Parker, Chippewa-Cree affiliation
Roselynn Parker, Chippewa-Cree affiliation

Roselynne is from the Rocky Boy Reservation in Montana. A freshman at a Montana tribal college, she is pursuing a degree in Native American Studies and then a master’s to teach at the college level and inspire others as a person and a leader. Roselynne was inspired to Native studies by Virginia Allery, Ph.D., who taught the subject at the tribal college in Roselynne’s home town. “How big our culture plays in our lives, I think that’s what grabbed my interest in this field,” Roselynne told us.

“Getting a laptop will help me in school. I’ll be able to stay in my dorm and have a lot of information all in one place. I’m grateful to receive this and am glad I took advantage of opportunities like this and the AIEF scholarship.” In thinking about the connection between heritage and education, Roselynne shared, “The main factor for me is to become a better person for my family and my people. I get sad at the thought of my reservation sometimes, and I want to do something about it. I feel that my focus on tribal historic preservation will bring out the cultural side on my reservation and help get them on a better footing.”

Winner #2 (Nov. 2): Andrea Medina, Zia affiliation
Andrea Medina, Zia affiliation

Andrea is from Zia Pueblo in New Mexico. A freshman at a Kansas University, she is pursuing a degree in Elementary Education and hopes to return to her home reservation after college to teach the children and prevent high dropout rates. She feels that as a tribal citizen keeping the tradition and culture alive in her community is important.

“The laptop will help me get ahead on my assignments. I wouldn’t have to wait for an open computer in the study room of my dorm, after the library is closed. It will also give me an advantage with turning in assignments online and taking notes in class.” Andrea shared that education and heritage are connected for her. “Both heritage and education represent a chance to learn. They are also connected to me by the importance of what both can do in my life. They connect in ways that make me a better person.”

Winner #3 (Nov. 3): Hunter Warren, Navajo affiliation
Hunter, Navajo affiliation

Hunter is from the Navajo Nation in Arizona. A freshman and first-generation student (first in his family to attend college), he has three sisters and two brothers at home. Warren is pursuing a doctoral degree in Pharmacy and plans to help indigenous and non-indigenous people fight diabetes, obesity and other health issues. He shared with us, “We are very rich in our culture and we believe in all of the sacred traditions. All I hope for is for the U.S. to be healthy and happy.”

Hunter feels the laptop will help him avoid late hours at school, as well as the 45-minute drive each way late at night or early in the morning just to access a computer and turn in all his work on time. He shared, “It’s tiring for me. So, having a laptop I can come home to will be very helpful to me and a great benefit in my schoolwork.” Hunter sees a connection between heritage and education, in that he will inherit all the knowledge taught by his professors, much as he did the knowledge taught through his heritage and tribe. “I’ll be able to use my heritage for success in education, and once learned,” he says, “I’ll be able to use my education to make my own path and honor my heritage as well.”

Winner #4 (Nov. 6): Myah Red Horse, Cheyenne River Sioux affiliation
Myah, Cheyenne River Sioux affiliation

Myah is from the Cheyenne River Reservation in South Dakota. A freshman and first-generation student, Myah is a direct descendant of Lakota Mnicoujou Chief Tasunka Luta (Red Horse). She is studying Political Science and American Indian Studies.

“The laptop will give me access to online assignments, D2L, web advisor, and emails. So, I will be better able to keep up with the pace of my classes, as I am currently taking 17 credit hours.” Myah shares, “Education and heritage are connected for me in almost every aspect, they go hand in hand. We as First Nations Peoples have to do more than the average person to pursue an education, so we can continue to exist. If we are not educated about what has, is, and will happen to us, we will have no voice to represent ourselves.”

Winner #5 (Nov. 7): Deedra Cadman, Navajo affiliation
Native woman in traditional wear

Deedra is from the Navajo Nation in New Mexico. A freshman and first-generation student, Deedra was inspired to attend college by her mother and father and the daily challenges they continue to face. She told us, “The way I look at my future, I want to do more for myself by getting an education, and then bring back to my parents my accomplishments.” Deedra is pursuing a degree in Biology, and then planning for Pre-Med and will ultimately become a doctor so she can give back to her community that which has been given to her.

“The laptop will mostly help me with my homework, with taking notes in class, and also with doing assignments between classes at school. I will also be able to do my studies on my laptop, during visits home to see my family,” Deedra is finding a connection between education and heritage in that her college has so many helpful programs, as well as a great diversity of tribes represented by the Native students attending the school.”


View our complete contest rules and visit us daily for the next chance win.


Take the Daily Quiz and Enter Daily Giveaways

There is a gap or disconnect between public perception of Native Americans and the realities on the reservations, including realities related to Native education. We hope you find it enlightening as we address some of these misconceptions through our American Indian Education Quiz. Please register on this contest page to participate on Nov 8, 9, 10, 13 or 14, and you’ll be entered for a chance to win the daily drawing.


Question 1: Why does attaining a college degree mean more for Native American students?

Question 1:
Why does attaining a college degree mean more for Native American students? (Choose all that apply.)
a. About 50 percent of Native American students graduate from high school.
b. Native American students receive a free ride (full funding) for college.
c. Native American students are often the first in their families to attend college.
d. Many Native students believe college is not an option for them.


Congratulations to Linda H., the winner of the giveaway for a framed, 16x22 “Mother and Daughter” print by Cree artist Betty Albert.

Question 2: Why is the freshman year of college more of a challenge for Native American students?

Question 2:
Why is the freshman year of college more of a challenge for Native American students? (Choose all that apply.)
a. Unexpected expenses impact a student’s ability to stay in college once they’ve started.
b. Off-reservation colleges lack cultural understanding and inclusion for Native students.
c. Bureau of Indian Education schools are underfunded.
d. Many Native students have never lived off-reservation prior to college.


Congratulations to Carla M., the winner of the giveaway for a “Our Spirits Don’t Speak English,” DVD with Cherokee actor Gayle Ross about Indian boarding schools.

Question 3: What one experience is most unique to Native American students in the U.S.?

Question 3:
What one experience is most unique to Native American students in the U.S.?
a. Many Native students live or have lived on a reservation.
b. Many Native students practice the traditions of their tribe.
c. Many Native students attended boarding schools.
d. Some Native American students did not attend school.


Congratulations to Jessica P., from Chicago, IL, the winner of the giveaway for the Navajo hand-made 6-inch dream catcher and medicine wheel.

Question 4: What is the average cost of back-to-school supplies on a reservation?

Question 4:
What is the average cost of back-to-school supplies on a reservation?
a. School supplies on the reservation cost 3 times more than supplies in off-reservation stores.
b. Sometimes school supplies don’t cost anything in a reservation community, because there is no local store that sells them.
c. Native American students receive school supplies for free under the treaties.
d. Sometimes families buy food or gas instead of school supplies, due to budgetary limits.


Congratulations to Debora P., the winner of the giveaway for a boxed DVD set by PBS titled “We Shall Remain,” on Native American history.

Question 5: Why are education and heritage connected for Native American students?

Question 5:
Why are education and heritage connected for Native American students?
a. Many Native students pursue a college education in order to help their communities.
b. Native students want to make their families and community proud.
c. College education is a good way to compete for the limited jobs on the reservations.
d. College education means greater recognition and contribution to society at large.


Congratulations to David J., the winner of the giveaway for a hoodie designed by PWNA and commemorating American Indian Heritage Month.

View our complete contest rules.


Daily Giveaways

  • Nov 08: Today’s giveaway is a framed, 16x22 “Mother and Daughter” print by Cree artist Betty Albert.
  • Nov 09: Today’s giveaway is “Our Spirits Don’t Speak English,” a DVD with Cherokee actor Gayle Ross about Indian boarding schools.
  • Nov 10: Today’s giveaway is a Navajo hand-made 6-inch dream catcher and medicine wheel.
  • Nov 13: Today’s giveaway is a boxed DVD set by PBS titled “We Shall Remain,” on Native American history from a Native perspective.
  • Nov 14: Today’s giveaway is a hoodie designed by PWNA and commemorating American Indian Heritage Month. Learn More
  • Nov 15: Today’s grand prize giveaway is the “American Indian Christmas” CD, by Lumbee artist and NAMMY winner Jana Mashonee. (See below for more information.)


Grand Prize Information

thumbnail of Indian Christmas CD by Native American artist Jana Mashonee

On Nov. 15, 2017, PWNA will giveaway the “American Indian Christmas” CD to a lucky winner. This beautiful and inspirational music is by Native American artist, Jana Mashonee. Learn more.

The winner will be selected, through a computerized random drawing, from a list of names for everyone who registers on this contest page between November 1 through 14, 2017.

View our complete contest rules.

Update: Congratulations to Felicia H., the Grand Prize winner of the “American Indian Christmas” CD by Native American artist Jana Mashonee.


Spread the word!

Share on Facebook Facebook: On some college campuses, few Native American students own a laptop or have Internet access at home to further their school work. Join #PWNA4HeritageMonth as we award laptops to 5 AIEF freshman students and host a Native education quiz with random daily prizes: www.PWNA4hope.org

Share on Twitter Twitter: Join #PWNA4HeritageMonth for daily giveaways, including 5 student laptops and other prizes: www.PWNA4hope.org

Share on LinkedIn LinkedIn: November is National American Indian Heritage Month and we’re exploring the connection between Native education and heritage. Join #PWNA4HeritageMonth as we award laptops to 5 AIEF freshman students and host a Native education quiz with random daily prizes: www.PWNA4hope.org


After American Indian Heritage Month is over, we hope you will continue learning and sharing with us. If you haven’t done so already, please register on the PWNA website or PWNA blog so we can hear from you regularly and you can stay tuned for our holiday promotions.

Official Giveaway Contest Rules and Prizes



Archives


2017 Backpack Drive
2017 Winter Warmth
2016 American Indian Heritage Month
2016 Backpack Drive
2015 American Indian Heritage Month
PWNA 100-Day Supply Drive


Support Native
Education


Contribute Today


> */

November is National American Indian Heritage Month.

Celebrating National American Indian Heritage Month by honoring Native American students

Partnership With Native Americans (PWNA) is recognizing National American Indian Heritage Month by honoring Native American students and the connection between history, education and heritage. Join us from November 1 through 15, 2017 for daily prizes and a Native education quiz. Winners will be announced every weekday. View our complete contest rules and visit us daily for the next chance to win.



AIEF Laptop Winners   Native Quiz   Grand Prize Drawing


Student Spotlight on AIEF Laptop Winners

PWNA, through its American Indian Education Fund (AIEF) program, awards scholarships to undergraduate and graduate students annually. This Heritage Month, we are also awarding laptops to 5 freshman students who are AIEF scholarship recipients. Check back daily on Nov. 1, 2, 3, 6 and 7 for updates on our daily winners.


Winner #1 (Nov. 1): Roselynne Parker, Chippewa-Cree affiliation
Roselynn Parker, Chippewa-Cree affiliation

Roselynne is from the Rocky Boy Reservation in Montana. A freshman at a Montana tribal college, she is pursuing a degree in Native American Studies and then a master’s to teach at the college level and inspire others as a person and a leader. Roselynne was inspired to Native studies by Virginia Allery, Ph.D., who taught the subject at the tribal college in Roselynne’s home town. “How big our culture plays in our lives, I think that’s what grabbed my interest in this field,” Roselynne told us.

“Getting a laptop will help me in school. I’ll be able to stay in my dorm and have a lot of information all in one place. I’m grateful to receive this and am glad I took advantage of opportunities like this and the AIEF scholarship.” In thinking about the connection between heritage and education, Roselynne shared, “The main factor for me is to become a better person for my family and my people. I get sad at the thought of my reservation sometimes, and I want to do something about it. I feel that my focus on tribal historic preservation will bring out the cultural side on my reservation and help get them on a better footing.”

Winner #2 (Nov. 2): Andrea Medina, Zia affiliation
Andrea Medina, Zia affiliation

Andrea is from Zia Pueblo in New Mexico. A freshman at a Kansas University, she is pursuing a degree in Elementary Education and hopes to return to her home reservation after college to teach the children and prevent high dropout rates. She feels that as a tribal citizen keeping the tradition and culture alive in her community is important.

“The laptop will help me get ahead on my assignments. I wouldn’t have to wait for an open computer in the study room of my dorm, after the library is closed. It will also give me an advantage with turning in assignments online and taking notes in class.” Andrea shared that education and heritage are connected for her. “Both heritage and education represent a chance to learn. They are also connected to me by the importance of what both can do in my life. They connect in ways that make me a better person.”

Winner #3 (Nov. 3): Hunter Warren, Navajo affiliation
Hunter, Navajo affiliation

Hunter is from the Navajo Nation in Arizona. A freshman and first-generation student (first in his family to attend college), he has three sisters and two brothers at home. Warren is pursuing a doctoral degree in Pharmacy and plans to help indigenous and non-indigenous people fight diabetes, obesity and other health issues. He shared with us, “We are very rich in our culture and we believe in all of the sacred traditions. All I hope for is for the U.S. to be healthy and happy.”

Hunter feels the laptop will help him avoid late hours at school, as well as the 45-minute drive each way late at night or early in the morning just to access a computer and turn in all his work on time. He shared, “It’s tiring for me. So, having a laptop I can come home to will be very helpful to me and a great benefit in my schoolwork.” Hunter sees a connection between heritage and education, in that he will inherit all the knowledge taught by his professors, much as he did the knowledge taught through his heritage and tribe. “I’ll be able to use my heritage for success in education, and once learned,” he says, “I’ll be able to use my education to make my own path and honor my heritage as well.”

Winner #4 (Nov. 6): Myah Red Horse, Cheyenne River Sioux affiliation
Myah, Cheyenne River Sioux affiliation

Myah is from the Cheyenne River Reservation in South Dakota. A freshman and first-generation student, Myah is a direct descendant of Lakota Mnicoujou Chief Tasunka Luta (Red Horse). She is studying Political Science and American Indian Studies.

“The laptop will give me access to online assignments, D2L, web advisor, and emails. So, I will be better able to keep up with the pace of my classes, as I am currently taking 17 credit hours.” Myah shares, “Education and heritage are connected for me in almost every aspect, they go hand in hand. We as First Nations Peoples have to do more than the average person to pursue an education, so we can continue to exist. If we are not educated about what has, is, and will happen to us, we will have no voice to represent ourselves.”

Winner #5 (Nov. 7): Deedra Cadman, Navajo affiliation
Native woman in traditional wear

Deedra is from the Navajo Nation in New Mexico. A freshman and first-generation student, Deedra was inspired to attend college by her mother and father and the daily challenges they continue to face. She told us, “The way I look at my future, I want to do more for myself by getting an education, and then bring back to my parents my accomplishments.” Deedra is pursuing a degree in Biology, and then planning for Pre-Med and will ultimately become a doctor so she can give back to her community that which has been given to her.

“The laptop will mostly help me with my homework, with taking notes in class, and also with doing assignments between classes at school. I will also be able to do my studies on my laptop, during visits home to see my family,” Deedra is finding a connection between education and heritage in that her college has so many helpful programs, as well as a great diversity of tribes represented by the Native students attending the school.”


View our complete contest rules and visit us daily for the next chance win.


Take the Daily Quiz and Enter Daily Giveaways

There is a gap or disconnect between public perception of Native Americans and the realities on the reservations, including realities related to Native education. We hope you find it enlightening as we address some of these misconceptions through our American Indian Education Quiz. Please register on this contest page to participate on Nov 8, 9, 10, 13 or 14, and you’ll be entered for a chance to win the daily drawing.


Question 1: Why does attaining a college degree mean more for Native American students?

Question 1:
Why does attaining a college degree mean more for Native American students? (Choose all that apply.)
a. About 50 percent of Native American students graduate from high school.
b. Native American students receive a free ride (full funding) for college.
c. Native American students are often the first in their families to attend college.
d. Many Native students believe college is not an option for them.


Congratulations to Linda H., the winner of the giveaway for a framed, 16x22 “Mother and Daughter” print by Cree artist Betty Albert.

Question 2: Why is the freshman year of college more of a challenge for Native American students?

Question 2:
Why is the freshman year of college more of a challenge for Native American students? (Choose all that apply.)
a. Unexpected expenses impact a student’s ability to stay in college once they’ve started.
b. Off-reservation colleges lack cultural understanding and inclusion for Native students.
c. Bureau of Indian Education schools are underfunded.
d. Many Native students have never lived off-reservation prior to college.


Congratulations to Carla M., the winner of the giveaway for a “Our Spirits Don’t Speak English,” DVD with Cherokee actor Gayle Ross about Indian boarding schools.

Question 3: What one experience is most unique to Native American students in the U.S.?

Question 3:
What one experience is most unique to Native American students in the U.S.?
a. Many Native students live or have lived on a reservation.
b. Many Native students practice the traditions of their tribe.
c. Many Native students attended boarding schools.
d. Some Native American students did not attend school.


Congratulations to Jessica P., from Chicago, IL, the winner of the giveaway for the Navajo hand-made 6-inch dream catcher and medicine wheel.

Question 4: What is the average cost of back-to-school supplies on a reservation?

Question 4:
What is the average cost of back-to-school supplies on a reservation?
a. School supplies on the reservation cost 3 times more than supplies in off-reservation stores.
b. Sometimes school supplies don’t cost anything in a reservation community, because there is no local store that sells them.
c. Native American students receive school supplies for free under the treaties.
d. Sometimes families buy food or gas instead of school supplies, due to budgetary limits.


Congratulations to Debora P., the winner of the giveaway for a boxed DVD set by PBS titled “We Shall Remain,” on Native American history.

Question 5: Why are education and heritage connected for Native American students?

Question 5:
Why are education and heritage connected for Native American students?
a. Many Native students pursue a college education in order to help their communities.
b. Native students want to make their families and community proud.
c. College education is a good way to compete for the limited jobs on the reservations.
d. College education means greater recognition and contribution to society at large.


Congratulations to David J., the winner of the giveaway for a hoodie designed by PWNA and commemorating American Indian Heritage Month.

View our complete contest rules.


Daily Giveaways

  • Nov 08: Today’s giveaway is a framed, 16x22 “Mother and Daughter” print by Cree artist Betty Albert.
  • Nov 09: Today’s giveaway is “Our Spirits Don’t Speak English,” a DVD with Cherokee actor Gayle Ross about Indian boarding schools.
  • Nov 10: Today’s giveaway is a Navajo hand-made 6-inch dream catcher and medicine wheel.
  • Nov 13: Today’s giveaway is a boxed DVD set by PBS titled “We Shall Remain,” on Native American history from a Native perspective.
  • Nov 14: Today’s giveaway is a hoodie designed by PWNA and commemorating American Indian Heritage Month. Learn More
  • Nov 15: Today’s grand prize giveaway is the “American Indian Christmas” CD, by Lumbee artist and NAMMY winner Jana Mashonee. (See below for more information.)


Grand Prize Information

thumbnail of Indian Christmas CD by Native American artist Jana Mashonee

On Nov. 15, 2017, PWNA will giveaway the “American Indian Christmas” CD to a lucky winner. This beautiful and inspirational music is by Native American artist, Jana Mashonee. Learn more.

The winner will be selected, through a computerized random drawing, from a list of names for everyone who registers on this contest page between November 1 through 14, 2017.

View our complete contest rules.

Update: Congratulations to Felicia H., the Grand Prize winner of the “American Indian Christmas” CD by Native American artist Jana Mashonee.


Spread the word!

Share on Facebook Facebook: On some college campuses, few Native American students own a laptop or have Internet access at home to further their school work. Join #PWNA4HeritageMonth as we award laptops to 5 AIEF freshman students and host a Native education quiz with random daily prizes: www.PWNA4hope.org

Share on Twitter Twitter: Join #PWNA4HeritageMonth for daily giveaways, including 5 student laptops and other prizes: www.PWNA4hope.org

Share on LinkedIn LinkedIn: November is National American Indian Heritage Month and we’re exploring the connection between Native education and heritage. Join #PWNA4HeritageMonth as we award laptops to 5 AIEF freshman students and host a Native education quiz with random daily prizes: www.PWNA4hope.org


After American Indian Heritage Month is over, we hope you will continue learning and sharing with us. If you haven’t done so already, please register on the PWNA website or PWNA blog so we can hear from you regularly and you can stay tuned for our holiday promotions.

Official Giveaway Contest Rules and Prizes



Archives


2017 Backpack Drive
2017 Winter Warmth
2016 American Indian Heritage Month
2016 Backpack Drive
2015 American Indian Heritage Month
PWNA 100-Day Supply Drive


Support Native
Education


Contribute Today


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