Services

Grants

Puppies Animal lovers pulled together and helped make it possible to purchase a mobile unit to control the overpopulation.

On resource-strapped Native American reservation animal shelters, every little bit that can save a dollar helps. In addition to seeking donations, some may host old-fashioned fundraisers like bake sales or gather old cans for recycling to afford the high cost of rescuing lost dogs and cats.

Sadly, it isn’t always enough when building foundations are crumbling or if a new mobile unit for spay and neuter services is required. That’s when the ROAR Program steps in to help with a grant.

We take each request seriously and research the facts thoroughly. Although we would love to consent to every Program Partner’s grant petition, we also need to be good stewards for our generous supporters. Thankfully, our donors have huge hearts for animals in need.

Kittens This grant helped make one shelter safer for animals and staff.

For example, one Partner in a western Montana reservation had a major problem with their foundation. The staff had tried to stop the cracks from crawling up to the ceiling and minimize those creeping towards the floor, but it was losing battle. Without a new cement slab and appropriate floor drains, the hazards to animals and staff would have continued. Thankfully, donors recognized the dire need and helped to raise the funds to help provide a safer environment for the precious kittens and puppies they rescue.

Another Partner in northeastern Montana had a time-limited opportunity to purchase a semi-truck and trailer to start a mobile clinic for spay and neuter services. But, they had to move fast before their chance was lost. Again, our gracious donors stepped in to help them control the over-population of lost animals on this reservation community.

Like these appeals, each application is taken on a case-by-case basis. We consider the need of the Program Partner and the animals involved, as well as the funds available. On occasion, our most dedicated supporters are asked to help when the need outweighs the money on hand.

One thing is for sure. Together — our staff, donors, and Program Partners — we can make a difference in the lives of dogs and cats, and the people who love them, on American Indian reservations.

How can I help?